simplynaijaforum

VIOLENT DEATHS IN UK: RISING VOODOO, KINDOKI, JUJU BLAMED

In Uncategorized on August 16, 2012 at 8:40 am

Even a misdemeanour such as bedwetting can put a child at risk of being labelled a witch — indeed, as we shall see, it was the fact that he wet himself that sealed Kristy Bamu’s terrible fate.

Likewise, girls from strict religious backgrounds who bring shame on their family honour by adopting Western attitudes have also been forced to undergo exorcism ceremonies where they are beaten and shouted at until they faint  with terror.

Dr Hoskins, an academic who has studied witchcraft for 25 years, gave evidence at the Kristy Bamu murder tria, where he said: ‘Even among educated people in London, I’ve met those who believe in kindoki [as witchcraft is known in central and western Africa] and that it has powers.’

This first caught public attention with the death of eight-year-old Victoria Climbie more than a decade ago in 2000. Victoria was killed in London by her great-aunt and partner, who said the sweet little girl was a witch.

A year later the torso of a five-year-old Nigerian boy, named Adam by police, was found in the River Thames after he was sacrificed. Police believe he was smuggled into Britain and his body parts used in a ritual medical ceremony to save the life of someone in the migrant community who was dying of an incurable disease. 

According to witch doctors, to kill a living person for medicinal purposes is the most empowering form of sacrifice and, the most potent form of all is to kill an innocent child.

In some forms of African witchcraft, heads and other body parts can be buried in front of homes to keep bad spirits at bay. A cup of human blood is said to boost vitality. A powdered concoction made from pieces of brain is believed to lead to riches.

Particularly prized are the genitalia of young boys and virgin girls. If these body parts are cut from a live child they are thought to add even more potency because of the victim’s screams.

That such practices take place overseas has long been known. But now they are happening here after being imported from other countries — and in truth they have been going on for years.

The headless torso of a black baby girl was found hidden in bushes in Epping Forest way back in 1969. Scotland Yard are now reinvestigating her murder and think it may have been the earliest case of a killing linked to African witchcraft on British soil.

The girl’s father, from north-west Africa, quickly became the chief suspect, but fled the country before he could be arrested and questioned. He is alleged to have cut off his daughter’s head, legs and arms during a ritual to bring him luck.

According to police and migrant advisory services, witchcraft ceremonies are spreading because of the increasing number of unregulated back street churches and mosques that have broken away from the mainstream places of worship to cater for millions of new immigrants from Africa, South Asia and the Caribbean countries, providing a link to their birth countries, cultures and customs.

Many of these horrific events are filmed and can be found on videos selling for a couple of pounds in ethnic shops and market stalls in London. What they show is terrified children, accused of witchcraft, being freed of ‘demons’. In one video I bought, a white-robed pastor is shown hitting a five-year-old boy with a long stick as the congregation chants approval.

His mother cries, but is held back from freeing her son because it is thought — by the prayergoers — to be the best thing for the family and their child. They are scenes which police believe are being repeated week after week in cities such as London, Birmingham, Leicester and Manchester.

But where do these cultural practices become blatant child cruelty punishable by the law?

Rachel Takens-Milne, from Trust For London, a charity that works to combat child abuse linked to witchcraft, says that cases such as that of Kristy Bamu are still rare.

But she added: ‘It doesn’t have to be at this extreme to be abuse. Calling a child a witch and publicly humiliating them is itself a form of abuse.’

And, worryingly, Detective Superintendent Terry Sharpe of Scotland Yard says that witchcraft-linked crime is ‘far more prevalent’ in this country than official figures suggest.

‘Children have been physically beaten and forced to drink unknown liquids in rituals to rid them of evil spirits. They have been starved and deprived of sleep.

‘Children have been blindfolded and had their hair cut off. They have had liquid poured on their genitals and been murdered,’ he said after the Kristy case.

So what of this innocent boy’s killers, the couple who appeared to be pillars of their local community? At the time Eric Bikubi and Magalie Bamu were busy renovating their London flat and would talk on the stairways to neighbours who thought they were a perfectly ordinary and loving couple.

Five years earlier, Bikubi had even served as a community adviser on child protection issues in the London borough of Camden.

To his family and friends, he was a talkative man, mad about football, who had trials for Arsenal and claimed to have played alongside John Terry. As for Magalie, she tied back her long hair, dressed with some style and had loved her job at Marks & Spencer.

But behind closed doors, the couple could not have been more different from this presentable image. Bikubi, in fact, had a long history of petty fraud and a conviction for carrying a knife on the street.

He also had an obsession with sorcery, which he shared with Magalie. He told police his ‘battle against witchcraft’ began in earnest when he travelled to Britain to escape the civil war in his native Democratic Republic of Congo aged eight.

Brought up as a Jehovah’s Witness and baptised into the Roman Catholic Church, he was himself accused of being a witch as a child and cast out of his family. His belief in witchcraft was so deeply ingrained that once, when he was in prison awaiting trial, he picked a fight with another inmate and was found licking blood from the man’s injured face.

It was to this murderous man’s home that an unwitting Kristy Bamu and his siblings were sent by their parents from their family home in Paris for a few days over Christmas in 2010.

His sisters, aged 20 and 11, were beaten along with Kristy, but escaped further attacks after ‘confessing’ to being witches. Two other boy relatives, aged 13 and 22, were made to join in the torture.

A nervous teenager, Kritsy wet himself during the visit and suddenly he was accused by Bikubi and Magalie of being a witch and bringing voodoo in the couple’s home. 

Bikubi forced Kristy to pray for deliverance for three days and nights without food and water.
The boy had a metal bar shoved in his mouth, he was struck in the face with a hammer and his teeth were knocked out. One of his brothers was forced to stand guard so he could not escape, while some of his siblings were made to mop up his blood.

 

He begged for forgiveness during his ordeal, and even confessed to being a witch to try to save his own life. All to no avail. When Kristy died he had more than 130 dreadful injuries on his body. His face was unrecognisable and pounded to a pulp.

Savagely killed by an evil couple in the name of witchcraft, it seems certain he will not be the last child to be maimed or die.

 
 
 
 
adapted from dailymail.co.uk
Advertisements
  1. […] Violent Deaths in Uk: Rising Voodoo, Kindoki, Juju Blamed […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: